Glossary

Terms beginning with E

Easter

1)     This is the major Christian feast which celebrates the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead. In New Testament times it was celebrated weekly as every Sunday was known as ‘the Lord’s day’ and honoured as a new Sabbath. Easter Sunday marks the end of the penitential period of Lent.

Ecclesiastical

1)     The word comes from the Greek meaning ‘church’.

Epiphany

1)     The season after Christmas which marks the showing of Christ to the Gentiles. The focus of the celebration is the recollection of the visit of the Magi or Wise Men to the baby Jesus.

Episcopal

1)     That which has to do with bishops. The derivation is from the Greek word ‘episcope’ or bishop

Eucharist/Holy Communion

1)     ‘Eucharist’ is the Greek word for ‘thanksgiving’. ‘Holy Communion’ is what Christians experience when they receive, under the sacramental form of bread and wine, the body and blood of Christ. This takes place at a service which recalls the Last Supper of Jesus with his disciples.

Evening Prayer

1)     Evening Prayer is the daily evening office of the church. During this service, which can be said or sung, canticles, Psalms, readings from scripture and prayers are read. In most cathedrals or college chapels this service is sung by a choir. The clergy of the Church of England are required to say Morning and evening Prayer daily in Church.

Evensong

1)     This is the name given to Evening prayer which is sung in cathedrals and some parish churches every day. It is based on the monastic office of Vespers and is made up of Psalms, scripture readings and prayer.

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Amendments

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All definitions © copyright EasternCathedrals 2004-2017+.
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Credits

The original core of this glossary was commissioned from Canon Phillip McFadyen of St George's Colegate, in Norwich.